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by Christopher Mudiappahpillai

I just finished this up on the way home today, and I highly recommend it.

From the jacket:

Many people in the United States believe that low-income children can no more be expected to do well in school than ballerinas can be counted on to excel in football, begins Washington Post education reporter Mathews (Escalante: The Best Teacher in America).

He delves into the Knowledge Is Power Program (KIPP) and follows the enterprise’s founders, Mike Feinberg and Dave Levin, from their days as young educators in the Teach for America program to heading one of the country’s most controversial education programs running today. Luckily for many low-income children, Feinberg and Levin believed that with proper mentors, student incentives and unrestrained enthusiasm on the part of the teachers, some of the country’s poorest children could surpass the expectations of most inner-city public schools.

Mathews emphasizes Feinberg and Levin’s personal stakes in the KIPP program, as they often found themselves becoming personally involved with the families of their students (in one case Feinberg took the TV away from a student’s apartment because the student’s mother insisted that she could not stop her child from watching it). Mathews innate ability to be at once observer and commentator makes this an insightful and enlightening book.

Work Hard. Be Nice.